By 1974 the 'BLF' or Builder's Labourer's Federation (NSW) had placed Green Bans over construction works that threatened the Centennial Parklands, Woolloomooloo, the Royal Botanic Gardens and The Rocks. Through these bans the union's membership expressed their commitment to building socially "useful buildings such as Kindergartens, homes for the aged, hospitals and housing for ordinary people." (1972 Jack Mundey, Letter to the Sydney Morning Herald in 1972.)  The Rocks and Millers Point the Green Ban was resolved when the Sydney Cove Redevelopment Authority agreed a compromise where some development could go ahead on the proviso that some residents were rehoused in quality accommodation but at low, affordable rents. (2015 National Trust Nomination to NSW Heritage Register.)

Denis Winston the first Professor of Town Planning at Sydney University, regarded human scale, diversity in housing, landscaped spaces and sculpture as essential to the pleasures of urban living. He would have delighted in the variety of the housing enclosing the Woolloomooloo Estate: side-by-side stand the new and the rehabilitated. (Text adapted from Sir Hermann David Black, from Opening Invitation of Denis Winston Place, Housing Commission of NSW and the Denis Winston Memorial Committee of the Planning Research Centre, University of Sydney, October 1981.)

To commemorate the building of Woolloomooloo Estate, the architecture faculty raised funds for a memorial sculpture by Margel Hinder to stand in Denis Winston square, designed by Mike Ewings. In 2013 the square was flattened and “anti-sitting” structures installed. Locals are campaigning for a joint council / Housing initiative to re-start the Margel Hinder fountain. Much of Sydney's innovative architecture in the late 1970s is a testimonial to community and union protest for mixed-communities, heritage and better housing.

 

Woolloomooloo Renewal Project Team (1975-81)

HCYoungTeam.jpg

Right: Housing Commission Fields Young Team, Team Leader and Planner John Devenish, Project Director Keith Gordon, Engineer Kevin Abrams, Community Relations Ian Vernal, Property Management Steve Sheen, Land Acqisition Jim Simpson and Architect Graeme Goodsell.

John Devenish (1944-1990), architect and urban planner, was invited to establish and direct a multi-disciplinary team to plan the Woolloomooloo Redevelopment Project for the Housing Commission of NSW. This project received eight design awards and international acclaim for effective community consultation and is a benchmark for design excellence in public building.

 

The external architects included Michael Dysart, Wills, Denoon Travis, Conybeare Morrison, Donald Gazzard, John Andrew, Perumal, Neill, Barbara & Partners, Travis, Jackson Teece Chesterman Willis, Ancher Mortlock and Woolley, McConnel Smith & Johnson, Maurice Brown, Fisher Lucas, McCauley, Conran & Briger.

 

Denis Winston
First professor of Town Planning at Sydney University is honoured with a square in Woolloomooloo opened in 1981. Denis Winston Place: designed by Environmental Landscapes PL and planted with Jacarandas, Robineas and Peppercorns, “an oasis of green around a pair of existing trees”. It honours Professor Denis Winston (1908-1980) the first chair of town and country planning in Australia. On 21 October 1981, the Chancellor of Sydney University also opened Margel Hinder’s bronze sculpture, named Denis Winston Library and launched a Memorial Appeal in his honour.

Denis Winston regarded human scale, diversity in housing, landscaped spaces and sculpture as essential to the pleasures of urban living. … He would have delighted in the variety of the housing enclosing the Place, new on two side, rehabilitated, though a century old, on the other two, with the elderly emerging form their houses to mix with the children form the others. (Text by Sir Hermann David Black, from Opening Invitation of Denis Winston Place, Housing Commission of NSW and the Denis Winston Memorial Committee of the Planning Research Centre, University of Sydney, October 1981.)

They raised funds for a memorial sculpture by Margel Hinder to stand in the square, designed by Mike Ewings. The square was recently flattened and “anti-sitting” structures installed.

Links:

Winston, Arthur Denis (1908–1980) by Robert Freestone - http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/winston-arthur-denis-12055

A visual reflection of the life and time of Denis Winston. Talk by Stacey Miers: http://sydney.edu.au/festival-urbanism/events/2015/audio2/DenisWinston.mp3

 

A Research Project by Stacey Miers on The Work and Time of Denis Winston. Animation by Moon Cube Design.

 

Green Bans Architecture

 

John Devenish (1944-1990)

Architect and urban planner, was invited to establish and direct a multi-disciplinary team to plan the Woolloomooloo Redevelopment Project for the Housing Commission of NSW. This project received eight design awards and international acclaim for effective community consultation and is a benchmark for design excellence in public building. See: NSW RAIA Chapter: John Devenish, residential design rehabilitation and infill, NSW Building Society Housing Awards, 1982, no 12. Awarded "With respect to its context but without a slavish copying of its neighbours."

 

Michael Ewings

Landscape architect who designed the landscapes of the Woolloomooloo Estate as ‘landscape masterplanning’. Their aim was to create a fully integrated development with more open space, expressing the trend of dissolving the streets in an attempt to blend green spaces with other functional and circulation requirements. Ewings established Sydney consultants Environmental Landscapes PL in 1977. He worked with architect Phillip Cox (one of the commissioned Woolloomooloo architects) on the Yulara Tourist Village at Uluru in Central Australia.


Tao (Theodore) Gofers

Designed the Sirius Building at The Rocks. Built by the Sydney Cove Redevelopment Authority, 1978-1979.

The building was also well known for a sign announcing 'One Way! Jesus' that featured in the window of Unit 74 facing the Bridge for more than 15 years. The creator, an elderly resident, was among those forcibly dispersed by the NSW Liberal Government in 2015.

Sirius is a 79-apartment residential building complex consists of repetitive geometric (cubic) elements stacked on top of each other to give a step-like terrace effect rising from under five storeys for much of the northern sections and part of the southern end, to eleven storeys in a high-rise block towards the south. The profile of the apartment building is a landmark in the Central Sydney Precinct.  It was originally intended to have a white finish to echo the Opera House but, due to budget constraints, the building remained in grey, off-the-form concrete. At the time of construction, one of the main complaints was that the building rose above the level of the Bridge's roadway. The general form is inspired in part by Moshe Safgdie's Habitat '67 residential complex in Montreal, originally built for Expo '67. Another Housing Commission apartment building designed by Gofers and built as a prototype for the Sirius Apartment Building, was built at 1A Ritchie Street, Sans Souci, on the site of a former trolley-bus, then bus, depot.

The majority of the apartments open onto gardens on the roofs of lower apartments, while there is also a communal garden on the 8th floor and ground floor courtyards. Hanging garden effects soften the appearance of the concrete. Inside, the main foyer has a slatted 'waving' timber ceiling and there are three-dimensional wood sculptures designed by the architect, Tao Gofers, based on European cave art figures. There are two community lounges, both with marvelous views, as well as service rooms and on-site parking. The foyer also accommodates a distress call panel indicating one or other of the aged care units should the resident press the alarm. This no longer works but is an important expression of the designer's attention to the requirements of elderly residents.

The Institute of Architects (NSW) has been campaigning for a decade for State Heritage Listing for Sirius. Brutalist buildings are a potent symbol of their time: The carefully modulated block, inspired by Moshe Safdie’s Habitat 67 in Montreal, Canada, contrasts with the public housing complex Greenway, on the other side of the Sydney Harbour Bridge, designed by Morrow and Gordon and built during 1948–1953. See: Architecture Bulletin, Mar-Apr 2012, Brutalism: a heritage issue at http://architecture.com.au/docs/default-source/nsw-journal/march-april.pdf?sfvrsn=0

This recommendation to list Sirius is opposed by the new lessee Department of Community Services. The foyer still houses the 40-strong team of 'relocation officers' evicting over 500 mostly elderly residents from the Sirius and Millers Point communities.

 

 

 

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